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Regular Life

In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on. – Robert Frost

DishNetwork Hopper, Joey, and DHCP Trouble

Quick review before the technical, DHCP-related stuff: I like the new DishNetwork Hopper. Okay, that’s finished.

On Monday, a DishNetwork technician came to my house and replaced my ViP 722 with a Hopper and one Joey. He had trouble getting the Hopper on my network, so I pulled up my router’s management page in my browser on my main PC. I never saw the Hopper while he was trying to make it connect, but it could have been a coincidence in timing, because I was working my regular job from home, too.

The technician’s solution to this was interesting and unexpected.

We had the Hopper plugged into exactly the same ethernet cable and port (on a router acting as a switch) as I had my freshly-unplugged ViP722 attached to for years prior to this. I have an ethernet cable connecting that “switch” to the router, and this has worked fine for not only my ViP722, but also for my PS3 and other devices as needed.

He changed out the ethernet cable, but got the same result. To fix the immediate problem — connecting the Hopper to the internet to complete his own testing, he quickly installed two network-over-A/C devices. He circumvented my “switch,” but still ultimately connected to my router providing DHCP.

I did my own testing later.

After removing his A/C network devices and attaching the Hopper identically to how my ViP722 had been, here is what I saw: (IP addresses changed to protect the innocent)

Attached Devices

Wired Devices

# IP Address Device Name
1 192.168.0.2
2 192.168.0.28 HOPPER_ETH0
3 192.168.0.29
4 192.168.0.30
5 192.168.0.35

This seems to account for my main PC, my Hopper, my PS3, my mobile phone network extender box, and one other device. Is it the Joey? (research here suggests each Joey gets its own IP address even though only connected via coax to the Hopper: http://www.chriscolotti.us/technology/dish-network-hopper-dhcp-issue/)

A minute or two later:

Attached Devices

Wired Devices

# IP Address Device Name
1 192.168.0.2
2 192.168.0.30
3 192.168.0.35

Curiously, the Hopper drops off the network, as does another device (the Joey, perhaps?), but the other devices are fine.

Less than a minute later:

Attached Devices

Wired Devices

# IP Address Device Name
1 192.168.0.2
2 192.168.0.29
3 192.168.0.30
4 192.168.0.35

Another device pops in mysteriously, but not the Hopper.

I then returned everything back to the way it was when the technician left:

Attached Devices

Wired Devices

# IP Address Device Name
1 192.168.0.2
2 192.168.0.28 HOPPER_ETH0
3 192.168.0.29
4 192.168.0.30
5 192.168.0.35

The above table did not change while refreshing several times over a five minute period, and has not in the time it took me to add the text to this e-mail.

What is it about the DishNetwork Hopper that is making my network do this? Is this a known but unpublished problem that the technician knew sometimes happened, and therefore eagerly tossed in that alternative connection method for no extra charge?

I am working to find someone else has seen this and can offer some insight. My router serving up DHCP is a NetGear N150 Wireless Router, model WNR100v3, but we were not using the wireless features at all. The router used as a switch was the trusty D-Link DI-524.

One Response to DishNetwork Hopper, Joey, and DHCP Trouble

  1. Btw, did you ever figure out the reason for this?

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