Regular Life

Regular Life

In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on. – Robert Frost

Goldeneye and Scaly (Project Green 03)

Trying to keep the 18-month old from splashing into the pond and the two pre-schoolers from walking into the black snake’s lair, I flipped open my mobile phone and called up to the house.

I had the wrong lens for the picture I was going to take, and the kids were bound to scare away my already suprisingly bold subject.

“Could you or somebody else please bring my blue camera bag down here? I need something from it, but I’m trying to keep the kids from drowning.” I said.

“Sure,” said my mother-in-law.

A couple minutes went by. I looked at the water. Yep, he was there, still as stones.

Shannon’s cousin arrived with the bags and grabbed up his son. Free to shoot pics at will, I swapped out my wide-angle for my telephoto, lay down on my belly, and rested my camera on a metal post that helped hold up the retaining wall.

I had never been that close before; I was in perfect position.

Bullfrog Unfazed

(click any pic to enlarge)

There’s nothing in the photo for size comparison, so I’ll just say that this guy’s head was as big as my hand.

Later, on the patio, Benjamin and I spotted the only anole native to the US. I know most of you are thinking, “What’s that?” Why, it’s a Carolina (or Green) Anole. This little guy was not as rock steady as the bullfrog, but he was much more tolerant than the average lizard. For this one I used my old, manual macro lens, so my camera was probably bout six inches from the lizard.

I’m like Grizzly Adams behind the camera.

Less Skittish

After lamenting the difficulty of finding an interesting subject for Anna’s current photo project, I finally struck gold. Er, I mean, green. In tribute to the late Steve Irwin I will say that, photographically, Saturday was one of the highlights of my life (heavy Aussie accent).

15 Responses to Goldeneye and Scaly (Project Green 03)

  1. You really struck gold er green there! :)

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  2. Awesome post Mark! I knew if you kept looking you eventually hit “green”….and wonderful pics “MATE”…..

    :)

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  3. Great shots! I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a large toad. The Anole is very cool… I’m fairly certain some of them reside within the walls of my home, at least in the garage… it’s all good, they eat the bugs.

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  4. Yeah, I’m just jealous! What great finds. I can just see you in the outback get up- very funny. And you know, if a kid or two has to get a little wet for the shot- so be it!

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  5. These are great. The frog came out so sharp. I’m glad you told us how big he is because I definitely understand how we could miss that from just the picture alone. It’s great that he waited for your lens to be delivered!

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  6. You HAVE to look at the bigger picture of that lizard to really appreciate it. The macro lens MADE that one Mark. I’m very impressed.

    I’m also impressed that you placed the safety of children slightly above your craving for a few good shots. That speaks volumes about you. My respect for you is finally on the rise!
    :)

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  7. Simon’s right, the textures (on both shots, really) make the picture. I’m impressed with both of these. I think the frong is a better composition, but the lizard is mesmerizing in his own way.

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  8. Wow. These are both wonderful. That frog is quite something, though.

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  9. I love it when others say I’m right. I have to get it more from my guy friends than my wife though, I’m afraid. Thanks Moksha.

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  10. Dude…didn’t you wish you had a gig with you? Good pictures.

    Froglegs are good eatin’. Tastes like chicken.

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  11. COOL!!!!

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  12. I like both shots because their eyes were so sharp. That makes a HUGE difference whether you’re taking pictures of an animal or a person. The frog had good light on him so I was able to get a little more depth of field (get more of him in focus), but the lizard was in a shaded area so I had to open the lens up wide to get enough light. Plus, even though he was more patient than most lizards, he was moving all around that post! The lens I used for him is more than 20 years old and optically my finest lens. That’s just one of the joys of using a Nikon digital SLR camera (but I don’t know that it would work with the entry-level Nikon DSLR’s). None of the three light metering modes work at all and I have to turn the aperture ring and focus manually, because the lens has no chip in it. Back to basics!

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  13. NIKON ROCKS! :)

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  14. Absolutely breathtaking photos Mark!
    I wish I could take that good a photo….

    BTW, check out my blog today… 2 incredible pictures there of some new visitors to my home! *chuckling*

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  15. Great shots Mark. I absolutely love that frog shot!! I’ve got to get myself a telephoto lens. Oh, and no thanks to you ;-) I’ve now got my own blog to be addicted over. LOL.

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